Health and Medicine

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10 new confirmed or probable coronavirus cases have been attributed to the Roanoke Valley, according to data released this morning by the Virginia Department of Health. State health officials are reporting 5 new cases in Roanoke City, 3 new cases in Roanoke County, and 2 new cases in Salem. No new numbers reported in Botetourt County. One death that was attributed to Roanoke County has been removed, while one death has been added to Roanoke City. It’s unclear if this is a death that may have been wrongfully attributed to the county instead of the city.

Governor Northam says most of Virginia will move to Phase Two of COVID-19 reopening on Friday. Restaurants are permitted to have indoor seating at 50% of capacity. Fitness centers may conduct indoor activities and workouts at 30% capacity. Facilities like zoos, museums and outdoor concert venues are permitted to re-open. Gatherings of up to 50 people will now be permitted. The easing restrictions cover almost all of Virginia, with the exceptions of Washington DC suburbs, Richmond, and Accomack County on the Eastern Shore.

NEWS RELEASE (Boldface sections detailing the changes are highlighted by WFIR for emphasis):
RICHMOND—Governor Ralph Northam today signed Executive Order Sixty-Five and presented the second phase of the “Forward Virginia” plan to continue safely and gradually easing public health restrictions while containing the spread of COVID-19. The Governor also amended Executive Order Sixty-One directing Northern Virginia and the City of Richmond to remain in Phase One.
Under Phase Two, the Commonwealth will maintain a Safer at Home strategy with continued recommendations for social distancing, teleworking, and requiring individuals to wear face coverings in indoor public settings. The maximum number of individuals permitted in a social gathering will increase from 10 to 50 people. All businesses should still adhere to physical distancing guidelines, frequently clean and sanitize high contact surfaces, and continue enhanced workplace safety measures.
Restaurant and beverage establishments may offer indoor dining at 50 percent occupancy, fitness centers may open indoor areas at 30 percent occupancy, and certain recreation and entertainment venues without shared equipment may open with restrictions. These venues include museums, zoos, aquariums, botanical gardens, and outdoor concert, sporting, and performing arts venues. Swimming pools may also expand operations to both indoor and outdoor exercise, diving, and swim instruction.
The current guidelines for religious services, non-essential retail, and personal grooming services will largely remain the same in Phase Two. Overnight summer camps, most indoor entertainment venues, amusement parks, fairs, and carnivals will also remain closed in Phase Two.
Most of Virginia is expected to enter Phase Two on Friday, June 5, as key statewide health metrics continue to show positive signs. Virginia’s hospital bed capacity remains stable, the percentage of people hospitalized with a positive or pending COVID-19 test is trending downward, no hospitals are reporting PPE shortages, and the percent of positive tests continues to trend downward as testing increases. The Governor and Virginia public health officials will continue to evaluate data based on the indicators laid out in April.
“Because of our collective efforts, Virginia has made tremendous progress in fighting this virus and saved lives,” said Governor Northam. “Please continue to wear a face covering, maintain physical distance, and stay home if you are high-risk or experience COVID-19 symptoms. Virginians have all sacrificed to help contain the spread of this disease, and we must remain vigilant as we take steps to slowly lift restrictions in our Commonwealth.”
Executive Order Sixty-Five modifies public health guidance in Executive Order Sixty-One and Sixty-Two and establishes guidelines for Phase Two. Northern Virginia and the City of Richmond entered Phase One on Friday, May 29, and will remain in Phase One to allow for additional monitoring of health data. Accomack County delayed reopening due to outbreaks in poultry plants, which have largely been controlled through rigorous testing. Accomack County will move to Phase Two with the rest of the Commonwealth, on Friday, June 5.

8 new confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases have been attributed to the Roanoke Valley by the VDH, according to data released this morning. State health officials are reporting 7 new cases in Roanoke City bringing the overall total to 167, and 1 new case in Roanoke County increasing the total number of cases there to 106. Data shows no new deaths in the Roanoke Valley over the past 24 hours.

“Probable” cases are defined as symptomatic persons with known exposure to COVID-19 but were not tested or whose tests results are pending.

It’s a slow recovery for health care systems across the country, four weeks after Governor Northam authorized a resumption of elective procedures. LewisGale Regional Health System is one example; CEO and Market President Lance Jones says they are now back to about 60 to 70% of patient levels for elective visits and procedures – and for the emergency room.  He says in some cases, the lack of earlier visits is creating greater health problems now. Jones  acknowledges that one reason many people have been hesitant to return is the perception that they will risk exposure to the COVID-19 virus – but health care providers, he says, have some of the highest-level safety precautions you will find anywhere. WFIR’s Evan Jones has more:

06-01 Hospitals Recover Wrap-WEB

 

 

The Virginia Department of Health reports 331 confirmed or “probable” COVID-19 cases in the Roanoke Valley since the virus first arrived. That includes 160 in Roanoke City, 105 in Roanoke County, 34 in Salem and 32 in Botetourt County. The VDH reports 23 deaths in the valley from COVID-19. Five new cases were reported in Roanoke City and one additional case in Roanoke County.

”Probable” cases are defined as symptomatic persons with known exposure to COVID-19 but were not tested or whose tests results are pending.

 

The Virginia Department of Health reports a total of 325 COVID-19 cases in the Roanoke Valley since the virus first arrived. They include 155 in Roanoke City, 104 in Roanoke County, 34 in Salem and 32 in Botetourt County. The statewide total as reported by the  Virginia Department of Health is 43,611, with 1,370 confirmed or “probable” deaths, 23 of them in the Roanoke Valley. “Probable” is defined as symptomatic persons who died after known exposure to COVID-19 but were not tested or whose tests results are pending.

12 new confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases have been added in the Roanoke Valley over the latest 24-hour reporting period. Five in Roanoke County, Five in Roanoke City, and two in Salem. There’s been no change in the number of hospitalizations or deaths in the Roanoke Valley according to the latest data from the Virginia Department of Health.

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