New exhibit at Salem Museum

A new exhibit opens tomorrow at the Salem Museum. WFIR Intern reporter Madison Everett has the story

6-23 salem Museum Wrap-WEB

 

 

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Star City Reads distributes more books

As part of the “Star City Reads” program Roanoke’s public library system is putting more books in the hands of kids from low-income families. The story on a program that kicked off today from WFIR’s Gene Marrano:

6-23 Book Rich Wrap#2-WEB

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Mountain Valley review finds limited environmental impacts

 ROANOKE, Va. (AP) _ An environmental assessment of the proposed Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline finds the project would have “significant” impacts on forests in Virginia and West Virginia but “limited” other adverse effects. The analysis was published Friday by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which oversees interstate natural gas pipelines. Its release marks a milestone in the approval process for the approximately 300-mile pipeline. FERC commissioners, who are presidential appointees, will consider the analysis in making a final decision. The commissioners don’t currently have a quorum, though two of President Donald Trump’s nominees are pending before the Senate. The Mountain Valley Pipeline and similar Atlantic Coast Pipeline have drawn opposition from environmental groups and many landowners along the routes. But many political and business leaders say the projects are necessary for economic development.

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POLL: Virginia voters oppose GOP health care plan 2-1

The results of a new Quinnipiac University poll that asks Virginia voters how they feel on several controversial issues. WFIR’s Ian Price has more:

06-23 Quinnipiac Poll WEB-WRAP

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Richmond mayor: Keep Confederate statues, but add context

The mayor of Richmond, Virginia says the city’s towering Confederate monuments should not be taken down, but instead should be supplemented with historical context about why they were built. Mayor Levar Stoney announced Thursday that a commission of historians, authors and community leaders will solicit public input and make suggestions for telling “the real story” of the monuments. He says they represent “a false narrative” meant to lionize the architects and defenders of slavery. The mayor says the commission also will consider adding new  monuments. His announcement comes as many other cities across the South engage in bitter debates over symbols of the Confederacy. Richmond served as the capital of the Confederacy and has one of the most dramatic displays of such statuary.

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Kaine says slow down on health care bill passage

U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine

Now comes a look at the finer details and vote counting on the Republican health care bill. Virginia’s junior Senator is a sure “no” vote as WFIR’s Gene Marrano reports:

6-23 Kaine-Health Folo Wrap#1-WEB

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