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AP

LANDOVER, Md. (AP) — Rookie running back Jaret Patterson did a little bit of everything and scored the go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter in Washington’s 17-13 preseason victory over the Cincinnati Bengals on Friday night.

Patterson, an undrafted free agent from Buffalo, ran for 71 yards, caught three passes for 25 yards and had a 37-yard kickoff return. His 1-yard scoring plunge was Washington’s only touchdown. Dustin Hopkins had three field goals for Washington (1-1).

Patterson, who is listed at 5-foot-9, insists that he uses his smaller stature as a positive as he fights to make the roster.

“I feel like my size is an advantage,” Patterson said. “I can hide behind the big offensive linemen. Just hiding behind those guys and having a low center of gravity. … I want to keep improving and show that I belong here.”

Coach Ron Rivera gave Patterson time early and often and liked what he saw.

“He’s an explosive, dynamic young back,” Rivera said.

“We gave him some opportunities with the first bunch and he did a nice job with that and then when the second bunch was in there he really showed his ability.”

Cincinnati (1-1) held out quarterback Joe Burrow for the second week in a row and the offense struggled. Burrow, the first selection in the 2020 draft, started 10 games last season before a season-ending left knee injury at Washington in Week 11.

Brandon Allen started in his place and played through the first drive of the second half, finishing 8 of 17 for 70 yards. The Bengals were 0 for 6 on third downs in the first half and finished 4 of 13.

Ryan Fitzpatrick played the first four series for Washington before making way for Taylor Heinicke. Fitzpatrick was 7 of 13 for 96 yards with most of that coming on two big plays. The veteran connected with Logan Thomas on the first play of the game for 28 yards and found rookie Dyami Brown for a 29-yarder just before the end of the first quarter. Brown’s catch set up Hopkins’ 34-yard field goal. It was the first points for Washington’s first-team offense through two preseason games. Heinicke finished 11 of 13 for 80 yards, and Kyle Allen wrapped up for Washington.

Allen capped off an eight-play, 64-yard drive with a 1-yard run to give Cincinnati (1-1) a 10-6 lead just after halftime. Washington looked as it recovered a fumble on the 1 but safety Darrick Forrest was called for unnecessary roughness hit when he knocked the ball loose on Allen’s 19-yard completion to Trenton Irwin. The Bengals kept possession and scored on the next play.

Kyle Shurmur and Eric Dungey both got second-half time under center for the Bengals.

Bengals kicker Evan McPherson connected from 37 and 50 yards.

NO JOE?

Bengals coach Zac Taylor was non-committal on Burrow’s status for Cincinnati’s final preseason game.

DROPPED BALLS

Cincinnati rookie wide receiver Ja’Marr Chase — the fifth pick in the draft from LSU — dropped a third-down pass on each of the Bengals’ first three drives. His drops on the second and third possessions would have resulted in first downs for an offense that mustered a total of two in the first half. He finished without a catch.

BACK ON TRACK

Hopkins went 3 for 3 the week after going 0 for 2 in a loss to New England. Hopkins, Washington’s kicker since 2015, made a career-low 79 % (27 for 34) of his field goals in 2020.

SOUNDS FAMILIAR

Heinicke, undrafted like Patterson, said he thinks he knows what the rookie is going through this preseason.

“Ever since high school I was told I was too short, too slow and didn’t have a strong enough arm,” said Heinicke, who was a star at Old Dominion before bouncing around the NFL. “I’m sure he’s heard the same thing.”

INJURIES

Bengals rookie DE Cam Sample left the game with a right shoulder injury but Taylor said the injury was relatively minor.

UP NEXT

Bengals: Cincinnati finishes the preseason Aug. 29 against the Miami Dolphins.

Washington: Hosts the Baltimore Ravens Aug. 28 in their preseason finale.

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BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP) — Few Power Five programs struggled through the pandemic more than Virginia Tech.

Coach Justin Fuente and the Hokies hope to restore order this season.

Over the course of a 5-6 season, the Hokies often went to practice not knowing who would be available, and eventually said they lost more than half their team — and defensive coordinator Justin Hamilton — for a period of time because of COVID-19 infections or quarantining that left them depleted.

This season, with a new quarterback in Braxton Burmeister, a group of running backs trying to replace Khalil Herbert and a defense that gained valuable experience over the past two seasons, there’s hope.

Burmeister, like Hendon Hooker before him, is a dual threat, described as fearless by teammates and an accomplished passer that leaves Fuente feeling better about throwing “than I have in some time.”

Burmeister will also need to be part of the running game solution while taking care of his body. His likely backup, Texas A&M transfer Connor Blumrick, has completed one pass in 18 games and run 10 times for 48 yards in his career.

“He’s ripped to shreds, has veins in his abs and jumps out of the gym,” Fuente said of Burmeister, who ran 39 times for 146 yards and two TDs.

The Hokies last season ran for 240 yards per game, their best since 2000, but much of that came from Herbert, who had 15 runs of at least 20 yards and finished with 1,182 yards and eight touchdowns.

There are options in the passing game with the top four receivers back.

In defensive coordinator Justin Hamilton’s second season, potential abounds, much of it after many players gained experience by being thrust into action early because of injuries and pandemic-related protocols the past two seasons.

Defensive end Amare Barno led Power Five players last season with 16 tackles for loss, and the converted linebacker “is only scratching the surface with knowledge of the position,” said Hamilton, a former Hokies defensive back.

Dax Hollifield always seems to be in the right place among the linebackers, and the secondary welcomes the returns of Jermaine Waller and Devon Hunter.

Here are some other things to watch at Virginia Tech in 2021:

RETURN TO NORMAL?

Fuente was frequently left shaking his head at the Hokies’ plight last year.

“I think if we learned anything, it’s that practice is actually important,” he said. “Our fall camp, once the students hit town, deteriorated into survival mode.”

EXPERIENCE UP FRONT

A big reason for the offensive optimism is players with experience.

Redshirt junior Brock Hoffman leads the way, but Maryland transfer Johnny Jordan joins and was honorable mention All-Big Ten last season.

Graduate student Tyrell Smith, redshirt juniors Silas Dzani and Lecitus Smith and redshirt sophomore Luke Tenuta bring size and leadership.

DROPPING BACK

Burmeister will have plenty of reasons not to tuck the ball and run too often because he’s got a well-stocked receiving group led by speedy Tre Turner (31 catches, 504 yards, 3 TDs) and Tayvion Robinson (33-494-2) and All-ACC tight end James Mitchell (23-368-4). Tailback Raheem Blacksheer can also line up in the slot. He ran for 255 yards and caught 17 passes for 156 yards in 2020.

LEARNING FAST

With no spring practice and his own need to quarantine, the Hokies spent some time learning Hamilton’s defense on Zoom calls. With so many absences in the secondary, they allowed more than 265 passing yards per game.

Not a number you’d expect from a school that hails itself as “DBU.”

Hamilton is delighted to have Waller and Hunter back in the fold.

“It’s a really good feeling knowing you have guys that have game reps of proving that they can handle adjustment, handle concepts, handle what an offense is doing.” he said. “They’re both fast learners. … That invaluable.”

SCHEDULE

The Hokies will need to start strong, opening at home against No. 10 North Carolina and traveling to West Virginia in Week 3. They also get No. 9 Notre Dame and Pitt at home, but will play No. 14 Miami and Virginia on the road.

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CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — Perhaps the first sign that Virginia’s players were disappointed with how last season went came quickly after it ended in a 33-15 loss to Virginia Tech.

The following day, coach Bronco Mendenhall announced that the team, bowl eligible in the strangest of seasons at 5-5, had voted not to participate in the postseason.

Eight days later, he announced that 17 fourth- and fifth-year players, several of them NFL prospects who had already exhausted their eligibility, planned to take advantage of the NCAA decision that all players from last season be granted another year of eligibility.

Defensive end Mandy Alonso, one of eight returnees taking advantage of that extra year, said the loss to the Hokies “just left a bad taste in my mouth this whole offseason.”

Even Keytaon Thompson, a quarterback turned all-purpose threat who transferred from Mississippi State last year said the loss to the Hokies gnawed at him for a long time, especially when rib injuries prevented him from being able to do much working out.

“That was all I was able to think about, our rival game,” he said.

On defense, safety Joey Blount returns after missing half of last season with what was termed a “lower body injury,” and may be the team’s most important defender. He’ll lead a secondary that allowed more than 300 passing yards per game last season but brings back much upper class experience and two transfers expected to compete to start.

Here are some other things to watch at Virginia in 2021:

TWO-HEADED QB

Brennan Armstrong is back at quarterback and so is Thompson. After competing for the job last season, the two are happy to be working in concert.

“Our relationship is a lot, a lot better than what it started off to be, obviously,” Armstrong said. “I’m super excited where we are now with him because he plays a huge impact in our offense.”

Thompson ran for 236 yards and two touchdowns, averaging 6 yards per carry, completed one pass and caught seven, including three for touchdowns in 2020.

“I can do whatever you need me to do,” he said.

TRANSFER HELP

Mendenhall has an interesting view on taking graduate transfers: He likes that, by graduating, they’ve shown their commitment to the academic side, needs to like them as a person and said he only considers bringing on players with a chance to start.

Virginia helped itself at tight end by bringing in 6-foot-7, 265-pound Jelani Woods from Oklahoma State. He’s expected to help as both a dominant blocker and pass catcher.

Among the five other transfers, cornerbacks Josh Hayes from North Dakota State and Anthony Johnson from ACC rival Louisville are expected to provide needed depth.

ROAD WOES

The Cavaliers are 17-2 at home the past three seasons, but just 3-11 on the road, and while Mendenhall almost doesn’t like to count last season’s 0-4 ledger, he knows that finding a way to perform better away from home is the next step up in the program’s growth.

“The year we won the Coastal, again we were dominant at home and beat not only Pitt but UNC on the road,” he said. “That’s the next level of expansion, to have consistency in our program, to maintain what we’re already doing at home, which is very strong, and then that has to travel, and that hasn’t yet. That’s one of the areas of growth.”

TITLE DEFENSE

Technically, Virginia is the defending Coastal Division champions because the Cavaliers won the division in 2019 and there were no divisions in the pandemic season, but several of the returnees are back determined to leave on a much better note.

“You could say that we’re defending it, but I just see it as a new year,” Alonso said.

SCHEDULE

The Cavaliers will play two of the three conference teams ranked in the preseason Top 25, No. 10 North Carolina and No. 13 Miami. They’ll also face No. 9 Notre Dame and Illinois of the Big Ten in Charlottesville and finish at home against the Hokies.

___

Photo: UVa

More than 200 University of Virginia students who didn’t comply with the school’s COVID-19 vaccine requirement have been disenrolled ahead of the fall semester. The Virginian-Pilot reports that the school disenrolled 238 students, including 49 who were enrolled in fall courses. University spokesperson Brian Coy says that may mean that “a good number” of the remaining students “may not have been planning to return to the University this fall at all.” Coy says the students were disenrolled after “receiving multiple reminders via email, text, phone calls, calls to parents that they were out of compliance.” They can re-enroll if they comply with the vaccine requirement or file an exemption by Wednesday.

About 96.6 percent of students have been vaccinated against COVID-19, according to a news release. The university granted 335 permanent vaccine waivers for students with religious or medical exemptions. The university also granted 184 temporary vaccine waivers for students who couldn’t get vaccinated but intend to get a vaccine once on campus. Exempt students must be tested weekly and wear a mask in indoor and outdoor common spaces.

MGN

BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP) — Few Power Five programs struggled through the pandemic more than Virginia Tech.

Coach Justin Fuente and the Hokies hope to restore order this season.

Over the course of a 5-6 season, the Hokies often went to practice not knowing who would be available, and eventually said they lost more than half their team — and defensive coordinator Justin Hamilton — for a period of time because of COVID-19 infections or quarantining that left them depleted.

This season, with a new quarterback in Braxton Burmeister, a group of running backs trying to replace Khalil Herbert and a defense that gained valuable experience over the past two seasons, there’s hope.

Burmeister, like Hendon Hooker before him, is a dual threat, described as fearless by teammates and an accomplished passer that leaves Fuente feeling better about throwing “than I have in some time.”

“He’s ripped to shreds, has veins in his abs and jumps out of the gym,” Fuente said of Burmeister, who ran 39 times for 146 yards and two TDs.

The Hokies last season ran for 240 yards per game, their best since 2000, but much of that came from Herbert, who had 15 runs of at least 20 yards and finished with 1,182 yards and eight touchdowns.

There are options in the passing game with the top four receivers back.

In defensive coordinator Justin Hamilton’s second season, potential abounds, much of it after many players gained experience by being thrust into action early because of injuries and pandemic-related protocols the past two seasons.

Defensive end Amare Barno led Power Five players last season with 16 tackles for loss, and the converted linebacker “is only scratching the surface with knowledge of the position,” said Hamilton, a former Hokies defensive back.

Dax Hollifield always seems to be in the right place among the linebackers, and the secondary welcomes the returns of Jermaine Waller and Devon Hunter.

Here are some other things to watch at Virginia Tech in 2021:

RETURN TO NORMAL?

Fuente was frequently left shaking his head at the Hokies’ plight last year.

“I think if we learned anything, it’s that practice is actually important,” he said. “Our fall camp, once the students hit town, deteriorated into survival mode.”

EXPERIENCE UP FRONT

A big reason for the offensive optimism is players with experience.

Redshirt junior Brock Hoffman leads the way, but Maryland transfer Johnny Jordan joins and was honorable mention All-Big Ten last season.

Graduate student Tyrell Smith, redshirt juniors Silas Dzani and Lecitus Smith and redshirt sophomore Luke Tenuta bring size and leadership.

DROPPING BACK

LEARNING FAST

With no spring practice and his own need to quarantine, the Hokies spent some time learning Hamilton’s defense on Zoom calls. With so many absences in the secondary, they allowed more than 265 passing yards per game.

Not a number you’d expect from a school that hails itself as “DBU.”

Hamilton is delighted to have Waller and Hunter back in the fold.

“It’s a really good feeling knowing you have guys that have game reps of proving that they can handle adjustment, handle concepts, handle what an offense is doing.” he said. “They’re both fast learners. … That invaluable.”

SCHEDULE

The Hokies will need to start strong, opening at home against No. 10 North Carolina and traveling to West Virginia in Week 3. They also get No. 9 Notre Dame and Pitt at home, but will play No. 14 Miami and Virginia on the road.

BENTONVILLE, Va. (AP) — An ATV driver is charged with drunken driving and child endangerment after a 7-year-old girl was killed and a 4-year-old boy was injured when the ATV overturned in Warren County, Virginia State Police said.

The crash happened Tuesday evening when the Polaris Ranger side-by-side was unable to maneuver the terrain on private property in Bentonville and overturned, police said in a release on Friday.

The girl was thrown from the vehicle and died at the scene and the boy was taken to a hospital with minor injuries, police said. The driver, Jerrell Leadman Jr., 61, of Bentonville, received minor injuries and was treated at the scene, police said. They were not wearing seatbelts.

Leadman was charged with one misdemeanor count of driving under the influence and two felony counts of child endangerment. Leadman is being held without bond. Additional charges are pending as the investigation remains ongoing, police said.

It’s not clear from online court records whether Leadman has an attorney.

MADISON, Va. (AP) — The founder of a Virginia service-dog company could pay about $3 million in restitution and other penalties to settle a lawsuit that accused him of deceiving customers and providing them ill-trained animals.

An agreement signed by a judge this past week ends litigation initially filed in 2018 by state Attorney General Mark Herring against Charles D. Warren Jr. and his Service Dogs by Warren Retrievers firm, originating in Madison County.

Herring’s office said in a news release that Warren’s dogs purportedly could assist people who have diabetes, autism and other disorders. But customers often were delivered poorly trained puppies with behavioral issues and inadequate training, The Daily Progress of Charlottesville reported. Warren charged $18,000 to $27,000 per animal, according to the lawsuit.

An amended lawsuit also alleged Warren misled customers and others in part about its affiliation with law enforcement agencies.

Under the consent judgment, which includes no admission of wrongdoing, Warren must pay $514,000 in restitution to consumers, $1.1 million to Virginia in civil penalties and legal expenses and over $1.4 million for charities that support purposes for which the company collected funds.

The collection of civil penalties and attorneys’ fees will be suspended if he meets conditions that in part require him to stay out of service dog-breeding business. Warren now lives in Florida, the judgment says.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The Virginia Department of Health announced Friday that third shots of coronavirus vaccines will soon become available for immunocompromised residents to better protect them as the delta variant continues to surge.

The announcement Friday evening came shortly after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that people with significantly compromised immune systems get a third dose of either the Moderna or Pfizer vaccines. The CDC guidance followed a late Thursday announcement from U.S. regulators saying transplant recipients and others with severely weakened immune systems can get an extra dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines.

The state health department says vaccine providers are expected to make third doses available over the next several days.

“This is important additional protection for people who have impaired immune systems,” said Virginia Health Commissioner M. Norman Oliver.

Cases of COVID-19 and hospitalizations are both on the rise in Virginia, although the state is not currently facing the same dire conditions as others in the South.

NEWS RELEASE: (Richmond, Va.) — The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) announced [Friday]that Virginia will make third doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines available for moderately and severely immunocompromised Virginians, starting as early as August 14. This move comes after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated its vaccination guidelines to recommend third mRNA doses for people who have significantly compromised immune systems. Vaccines are readily available throughout Virginia, and vaccine providers are expected to make third doses available over the next several days as they adapt their processes.

“This is important additional protection for people who have impaired immune systems,” said State Health Commissioner M. Norman Oliver, M.D., M.A. “As COVID-19 cases rise across Virginia and the country, everyone who is eligible should get appropriately vaccinated as soon as they can.”

The CDC’s move is the final step in the authorization process for third doses of the mRNA vaccines for some eligible populations. Studies have shown that people with a compromised immune system can have a weak response to the standard vaccine regimen, and that a third dose is needed to strengthen immunity in these persons and protect them from serious COVID-19 complications. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) evaluated those studies and recommended the change to the CDC on Thursday.

Only Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna are mRNA vaccines, and therefore the FDA has not recommended additional doses of the Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccine. Additionally, the FDA has not recommended booster vaccines for the general public. Those immunocompromised who have already received two doses of either Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech should wait at least 28 days after their second dose before receiving their third dose.  The third dose should be the same manufacturer as the previous two doses when possible, but this is not required.

This EUA expansion is estimated to  include approximately 3% of people in the United States. Immunocompromised persons are those whose immune mechanisms are deficient because of certain immunologic disorders or immunosuppressive therapy.  As of today, approximately 4,144,080 Virginians have received two doses of an mRNA vaccine and approximately 124,322, or 3% of these Virginians, may be immunocompromised and therefore be eligible to receive a third dose. Individuals with questions about whether they are significantly immunocompromised should consult their healthcare providers.

While available evidence shows that a third dose provides a modest benefit to improving the immune response to mRNA vaccination, it is important to remember that immunocompromised persons might still not have a strong level of protection against COVID-19, even after receiving a third dose of vaccine. Additional COVID-19 precautions remain important for this population. These include wearing a mask, maintaining physical distance from others outside of the home, and avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated indoor spaces until advised otherwise by their healthcare provider.

Persons who are significantly immunocompromised should also discuss the possibility of monoclonal antibody treatment options with their healthcare provider in case they get infected with or are exposed to COVID-19. Household members and other close contacts of significantly immunocompromised persons should get fully vaccinated to provide increased protection to their loved ones.

VDH, physicians and healthcare workers, and vaccine providers across the Commonwealth stand ready to assist this vulnerable population to obtain the added protection a third vaccine dose will provide against COVID-19.  Just like previous EUA authorizations and CDC ACIP approvals, additional clinical considerations have been published that provide more detailed guidance. These clinical considerations will provide necessary guidance to assist COVID-19 providers in implementing these new  recommendations. In Virginia, providers may begin administration of third mRNA doses for this vulnerable population across the Commonwealth in accordance with these clinical considerations.

For more information on COVID-19 in Virginia, visit vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus. Anyone age 12 or older can find free vaccination clinics near them by visiting vaccinate.virginia.gov or calling 877-VAX-IN-VA (877-829-4682, TTY users call 7-1-1).

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia lawmakers gave final approval Monday to a spending plan for $4.3 billion in federal coronavirus relief money, including funding for initiatives aimed at helping small businesses, increasing broadband access and replenishing the state’s depleted unemployment trust fund.

The budget approved by the Senate and the House of Delegates preserves most of a plan crafted by Gov. Ralph Northam and fellow Democrats, but also includes several amendments proposed by Republicans in the Senate, including raising bonuses for law enforcement officers. Under a compromise worked out by a conference committee, sheriff’s deputies and corrections officers will receive bonuses of $3,000, while state police will receive $5,000.

The budget will now be sent to the governor, who supports the budget compromise, according to Northam spokesperson Alena Yarmosky. The budget also calls for helping small businesses avoid a large tax increase by using $862 million of the federal money to replenish the state’s unemployment trust fund, which has been depleted by the large number of claims filed during the pandemic.

The budget also calls for helping small businesses avoid a large tax increase by using $862 million of the federal money to replenish the state’s unemployment trust fund, which has been depleted by the large number of claims filed during the pandemic.

Another provision will require the Department of Motor Vehicles to resume walk-in service at its customer service centers throughout the state within 60 days. Because of the pandemic, the DMV instituted an appointment-only system for in-person services 17 months ago, a system that has drawn widespread complaints from customers.

The budget plan also includes a provision that would establish regulations to allow student athletes — including students at four-year colleges and universities and two-year community colleges — to receive compensation from outside parties for use of their name, image and likeness in sponsorships, paid partnerships and advertisements.

Rep. Denver Riggleman

A House committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol has hired former Republican Rep. Denver Riggleman as a senior staff member, bringing on the one-term Virginia lawmaker as GOP leaders have criticized the panel as too partisan. Chairman Bennie Thompson announced Riggleman’s hiring Friday evening, saying Riggleman has a “deep background in national security and intelligence matters.” Riggleman served in military  intelligence before he was elected to the House in 2018. The committee is investigating the insurrection by former President Donald Trump’s supporters, who beat police, broke into the building and interrupted the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory.